Showing 1 - 20 of 494 Results

  • Mon Aug 21 2017

    Amphibious machine battles invasive reed on Lake Huron shoreline

    A group of phragmites fighters in Lambton Shores is waging a war with one hand tied behind its back. One area of the community where it has been working hard to beat back the invasion reed is 156 acres of wetland on the Lake Huron shoreline west of Kettle and Stony Point where rising water levels have been complicating things lately. While the U.S. has approved herbicides for use on phragmites growing in water, governments in Canada don't allow them, except in a few specific cases. “When we started, it was dry,” Nancy Vidler, with the Lambton Shores Phragmites Community Group, said...

    View Full Article
  • Mon Aug 21 2017

    Invasive species make their way into Sask.

    Invasive species have made Saskatchewan their new home. The fast spreading species can be plants, animals, insects or fungus. They pose a serious threat to the country’s native species and habitat. They’re also the second most common threat when it comes to species extinctions, habitat loss being number one. Matthew Braun is the conservation science and planning manager for the Nature Conservancy of Canada’s Saskatchewan region. He said here in Sask. were mainly dealing with invasive plants and mussels in our lakes. Seven of the 10 invasive species on the Conservancy’s list are fou...

    View Full Article
  • Sat Aug 19 2017

    Meet The Invasive Plants Threatening To Destroy Canadian Habitats

    Invasive species are a serious threat to Canada's native species and habitats, including in our parks and protected areas. Globally, invasive species are the second most common threat associated with species extinctions (habitat loss is number one), and they are one of the top threats to Canada's species at risk. Knapweeds There are five invasive knapweed species in Canada that were unintentionally introduced into Canada from Europe in the late 1800s, probably in alfalfa and clover seeds. All species have slender stems with purple (or sometimes white) flowers and grow from a deep tapr...

    View Full Article
  • Thu Aug 17 2017

    Nature Conservancy of Canada lists invasive plants which may affect Sask. crops

    The Nature Conservancy of Canada has come out with a list of the country’s Canada’s top 10 invasive plants. Saskatchewan happens to be home to six of the plants on the list. Cameron Wood is a Program Director with the Nature Conservancy of Canada. Wood says there are a few in particular that can be particular devastating. “The worst offenders in the province are things like Leafy Spurge and Canada Thistle,” Wood said. “So for producers, it will kind of get into their crops. It will affect quality. It will affect yield, production and that sortof thing.” Wood says they can also a...

    View Full Article
  • Wed Aug 16 2017

    Common tansy addressed along Smoky River

    A group of volunteers partnered with the MD of Greenview earlier this week to help address the overgrowth of common tansy along the Smoky River. The common tansy is a perennial that reproduces through seeds and rhizomatous roots. A single plant head can produce hundreds of seeds which are spread through running water and wind. Volunteers from the Grande Prairie River Rats, 7 Generations Energy and Canadian Natural Resources Limited – who volunteered in last year’s tansy control efforts at the same location – helped, along with the Alberta Invasive Species Council. Along with the co...

    View Full Article
  • Tue Aug 15 2017

    Canada's most dangerous plant' spreading, biologist warns

    It was originally brought to Canada to be decorative, but giant hogweed's effects are anything but pretty. The plant, native to Asia and Eastern Europe, produces a clear sap that can cause severe burning and blisters if it gets on skin that is met with sunlight. The Nature Conservancy of Canada is putting out a warning to all Canadians to be on guard for this invasive species. Dan Kraus is a senior conservation biologist with the organization. He spoke with As It Happens guest host Rosemary Barton to discuss how to spot giant hogweed and what can be done to slow the spread. Ok...

    View Full Article
  • Tue Aug 15 2017

    Eleven permits issued so far under Summerside's new pesticide bylaw

    View Full Article
  • Sat Aug 12 2017

    Alberta Agri-news offering advice on Common Toadflax, Bertha armyworm

    News Brought from Europe more than 100 years ago as an ornamental plant, Common Toadflax has now become a serious problem to rangeland and mountain meadows in North America. This perennial plant makes seed, but reproduction is primarily by sprouting from its extensive, creeping root system (rhizomes) – two-to-three week old seedlings can produce creeping roots. Identification Stems: Stems are erect, hairless, generally un-branched and can be as short as 15 centimetres or grow to one metre tall. Mature plants may have one to 25 stems. Leaves: Leaves are soft, lance-shaped, pale g...

    View Full Article
  • Fri Aug 11 2017

    Giant hogweed plant that can cause burns and blindness spreading in Canada

    The Nature Conservancy of Canada is urging people across the country to document sightings of the­ towering green plant. By The Canadian Press Wed., Aug. 9, 2017 It can cause third-degree burns and even permanent blindness – and it’s spreading. Giant hogweed is cutting a wider swath in B.C. and Ontario, and the Nature Conservancy of Canada is urging people across the country to document sightings of the­ towering, three-metre green plant with large umbels of white flowers. Dan Kraus, a biologist with the conservancy, said the invasive Asian species likely arrived in Canada in t...

    View Full Article
  • Fri Aug 11 2017

    Sad to see invasive species problems caused by carelessness

    As I was typesetting the Alberta Agri-news this week, the subject of a dangerous invasive species of plant, the Common Toadflax, brought instantly to mind a few experiences I’ve had in my career with stories like this. Common Toadflax is a very serious threat to agricutlre in Alberta. The invasive species doesn’t like to play nice with other plants, and if it gets its roots into an agricutlrual operation, big trouble is coming. The sad part is, Common Toadflax didn’t blow in on an ill wind, it was actually brought to North American by Europeans because they admired its beauty. Somehow th...

    View Full Article
  • Fri Aug 11 2017

    Weeding out Antler Lake

    Invasive species of weeds have been filling the Antler Lake area of Strathcona County, with a new partnership plan in place to clean up the rural region. Photo Supplied For seniors living around the Antler Lake region, common tansy has been infesting their yards for years. An invasive species, tansy is both noxious and difficult to eradicate without the use of chemicals. This makes it a particularly troublesome weed to remove, especially for the elderly. “Last year, the county decided they were going to crack down on common tansy,” said Leah Hamonic, president of the Antler Lake St...

    View Full Article
  • Tue Aug 8 2017

    Devil’s trumpet is a potentially deadly invader

    Although its exact origin is unknown, devil’s trumpet — otherwise known as jimsonweed — is found in many countries around the world in both agricultural and ornamental settings. Introduced to this province as a contaminant of agricultural seed, this smelly weed is under review by the provincial Agriculture Ministry and it has been recommended to be added to the Weed Act as a prohibited noxious weed. Jimsonweed is foul smelling and reproduces by seed only. Dense stands will yield an average of 1,300 to 1,500 seeds per plant. It is best eradicated early as it’s a strong competitor, interfe...

    View Full Article
  • Tue Aug 8 2017

    Rooting out latest invasive plant to strike Ottawa a race against time

    Rooting out latest invasive plant to strike Ottawa a race against time Japanese knotweed's aggressive root system can break through concrete, asphalt. Conservation experts in Ottawa are waging war on Japanese knotweed, an aggressive, invasive plant species which has taken root in more than a dozen places on the city's shorelines. If it's not controlled, biologists warn the foreign plant — strong enough to break through walls and roads — will spread, displacing wildlife and crowding out native plant species in many areas. "It grows so aggressively that it overpowers and overtake...

    View Full Article
  • Tue Aug 8 2017

    Weed of the Week: Saltcedar

    My great aunt farmed for her whole career. She used to say, “a sharp hoe is as good as a rain any day.” And there are weeds where no registered chemistry is available or that can be applied in riparian areas, so manual removal is one of the only options. Saltcedar is one of those and has been moving into Western Canada. It is the type of pest that makes droughts droughtier. A dry-range plant that is often seen along the edges of dry ditches or streams or on dugout banks, Saltcedar loves wet feet. It’s a heavy water user despite having a reputation for surviving droughts. Matur...

    View Full Article
  • Sat Aug 5 2017

    Downy Brome in Southern Alberta - Cochrane Now

    Downy Brome in Southern AlbertaCochrane NowThere has been rumour the weed is starting to become resistant to herbicides and making a resurgence in southern regions of the province. Weed specialist for Alberta Agriculture and Forestry, Nicole Kimmel, says she doesn't agree with the rumour though.and more »

    View Full Article
  • Mon Jul 31 2017

    'What's the point?': Charlottetown resident concerned about pesticide ban exemptions

    A Charlottetown resident is concerned that the cosmetic pesticide ban Charlottetown put into action on Jan. 1 of this year isn't going far enough. Mark Carr-Rollitt said that he has always been against cosmetic pesticides and thought the ban would stop their use. "I've never liked it, but there was not really anything I could do about it before because there wasn't a pesticide ban," he said. "I thought that this year that would be different." City bylaw Deputy Mayor Mike Duffy, who is also the chair of the environment and sustainability committee, said that citizens can apply...

    View Full Article
  • Sat Jul 29 2017

    Sarnia’s battle against invasive phragmites continues

    The City of Sarnia is gearing up for phase two in its battle against invasive phragmites along the Howard Watson Nature Trail. A stretch of the trail from Michigan Avenue to Exmouth Street will be closed starting Monday, July 31, while crews spray the reeds with herbicide. The same portion of the trail– which has the “worst” concentration of phragmites and has faced problematic fires– was closed in April while crews worked on cutting and grinding the plant’s stalks. That removed old, dried phragmites allowing crews to spot the younger plants which need destroyed. “We have more blad...

    View Full Article
  • Wed Jul 26 2017

    Invasive species phragmites taken root in Scugog

    Nearly 200 infestations of 'nuisance' plant found across the township NEWS Jul 13, 2017 by Chris Hall Port Perry Star SCUGOG — Already towering more than seven feet high at the start of summer, the densely-packed patch of phragmites swayed in the gentle breeze along a dusty Scugog sideroad. It’s a relatively new infestation, points out Geoff Carpentier, explaining how the green reeds that have stalks similar to corn have spread along the rural roadside in a short period of time. Still, it’s a tough slog to get through the new growth and to old brown stalks from past seasons that con...

    View Full Article
  • Tue Jul 25 2017

    Alien species invasions and global warming a 'deadly duo', warn scientists

    Invasions by alien species and global warming form a “deadly duo”, scientists have warned, with the march of Argentine ants in the UK a new example. The public are being asked to be on alert for invaders such as the raccoon dog and Asian hornet, as eradication can be near impossible after a species becomes established. As trade and human travel has become globalised many thousands of species have crossed oceans or mountain ranges and become established in new regions, with some causing “invasional meltdown” and over a trillion of dollars of damage a year. Recent research shows that ev...

    View Full Article
  • Tue Jul 25 2017

    Public urged to report Japanese knotweed in Lanark County

    A new invasive plant species — Japanese knotweed — has been spotted in Lanark County, and the public is urged to watch for and report it so steps can be taken to minimize its impact. “Japanese knotweed has become a big problem in other parts of Canada and the world,” explains Lanark County chief administrative officer Kurt Greaves. “The damage done by this plant to foundations, septic systems and asphalt has been well-documented. We all need to be proactive and work to eliminate this plant before it causes infrastructure damage and lowers property values.” Michelle Vala, the county’s ...

    View Full Article