Showing 1 - 20 of 459 Results

  • Tue Jun 20 2017

    Downy Brome in Southern Alberta

    Downy brome is starting to become a problem is Southern Alberta. There has been rumour the weed is starting to become resistant to herbicides and making a resurgence in southern regions of the province. Weed specialist for Alberta Agriculture and Forestry ...

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  • Sun Jun 18 2017

    Spotted knapweed sighting raises alarm

    The recent discovery of spotted knapweed in Regina has prompted efforts to raise awareness of this noxious weed. It is a scourge of forage lands in Montana, Alberta and British Columbia. Unless controlled early, it has the same potential in Saskatchewan. “Spotted knapweed is not commonly known in Saskatchewan at present, but is considered to be well-adapted to the dark brown soil zone,” said Clark Brenzil, a weed control specialist with Saskatchewan Agriculture. “By raising awareness of the weed and the potential for its spread, we hope to keep spotted knapweed from becoming a scen...

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  • Sun Jun 18 2017

    The great dandelion debate: Councillors grapple with balance between pesticides and aesthetics

    For more than a century, a flowering yellow plant has irked Calgarians. “Every year, without fail, the No. 1 complaint that we get on a yearly basis is dandelions,” Mayor Naheed Nenshi told reporters Wednesday. “The complaints are almost evenly split between people who say, ‘There are too many dandelions,’ and people who say, ‘Do not spray chemicals on those dandelions, I don’t want my kids playing on that.’ ” What to do about unsightly fields of yellow was debated at city hall as far back as 1915, according to Chris Manderson, urban conservation lead for Calgary Parks. “Somebod...

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  • Fri Jun 16 2017

    Five Summer Activities That Can Spread Invasive Species

    By Joe Dawson Nothing seems to draw people outside like a beautiful summer weekend. A rain-free Saturday could mean taking the boat out on the water for some fishing or a family camping trip. Conservationists have found, however, that many summer activities carry the risk of spreading invasive species. A species gets the name “invasive” if it is not native to a location and causes environmental and economic damage. Here are five popular activities that can spread invaders–and tips for enjoying them safely: Fishing Problem: Bait Algae Live fishing bait itself isn’t a problem. Nob...

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  • Fri Jun 16 2017

    Weed of the Week: kochia

    I would like to discuss two weeds over the next couple of weeks. One I will refer to as the scourge of the south and the other as the scourge of the north. Unluckily, I have worked in an area where the two come together so have experience with both. The scourge of the south is kochia. It was described in a column by Michael Raine in the June 11, 2015, Western Producer. Since then, there have been a few updates that need to be noted. As described in the article, kochia is notorious for its seed production with up to 15,000 seeds per plant, its seed disbursement through tumbling in t...

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  • Tue Jun 13 2017

    Know your enemy and its destructive potential, says provincial crop specialist

    All crops have a critical weed control period when they are most susceptible to significant yield loss from weed competition. The critical weed control period for canola is around 17 to 38 days after emergence. Peas can be as early as two weeks after emergence. “Other, more competitive crops, like the cereals, have a less defined critical period,” said provincial crop specialist Harry Brook. “If you can keep the weed pressure down until the critical period is passed, you minimize yield losses from weed competition.” Start by scouting. “Once a field has been scouted and a weed pr...

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  • Mon Jun 12 2017

    This quick-spreading weed gets an early start

    Spring brings lovely native flowers, but also noxious weeds. The aggressive perennial Canada thistle is a favourite of disturbed soils of all types. It starts sending shoots from horizontal roots to the surface of soil around mid-April, with flowers to follow in mid-June and continuing throughout the summer. Easy to distinguish from other weeds, this particular thistle has grooved, upright, hollow and woody stems that branch near the top of the plant. The leaves, generally lobed and spikey, have a tendency to vary in appearance. Usually purple, pink, or white, the flowers on these bot...

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  • Sun Jun 11 2017

    Wild parsnip treatment most debated item on South Frontenac Council agenda - www.kingstonregion.com/

    www.kingstonregion.com/Wild parsnip treatment most debated item on South Frontenac Council agendawww.kingstonregion.com/With a longer agenda than what most South Frontenac Council meetings have seen over the past couple of months, it was a weed spraying tender regarding the spraying of roadside wild parsnip that saw the most debate on Tuesday, June 6. Council heard ...

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  • Sun May 28 2017

    UNL study details spread of weed’s herbicide resistance

    LINCOLN — A multidisciplinary team from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln has quantified the pollen-driven spread of a gene that makes the state’s most problematic weed resistant to a popular herbicide known as glyphosate. Following the commercialization of glyphosate-resistant crops in 1996, glyphosate gradually became the most widely used agricultural herbicide in the world. But glyphosate-resistant common waterhemp is now the most damaging weed in eastern Nebraska, infesting more than 1.5 million acres of corn and soybean fields. As of 2016, it has been confirmed in 18 states through...

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  • Fri May 26 2017

    Taking phragmites personally

    Leslie Wood is an unlikely crusader against phragmites, the most invasive plant species in North America. A retired veterinarian from New Dublin, Wood has no background in plant biology and she knew little about the devil species as recently as three years ago. Since then, however, she has developed an encyclopedic knowledge of phragmites, attending lectures and giving talks herself on the dangers of the plant. She travels Ontario to attend invasive species conferences; she is taking courses in pesticides so she can handle the toxic chemicals needed to kill it; and in the back of her ...

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  • Thu May 25 2017

    Invasive plant phragmites a strain on wildlife, local resources

    As temperatures begin to climb, officials are reminding Ontarians to be aware of the increase in non-native wildlife and the impact these invasive species can have. One plant southern Ontarians should keep an eye out for is phragmites — a tall weed with rough stalks and a tassel-like top, Kellie Sherman of the Ontario Invasive Plant Council told CBC News. An outbreak of phragmites will basically create a dead zone in its surroundings, Sherman said. Birds, insects and even turtles can't survive in areas infested by phragmites. Because phragmites can grow up to five metres tall it ca...

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  • Thu May 25 2017

    Province still reviewing cosmetic pesticide ban

    Getting all the weeds out of your lawn is hard enough. For the third straight summer, Manitobans have had to do so under the umbrella of the province’s cosmetic pesticide ban. When the NDP enacted the ban in 2014, the Progressive Conservatives did not support it. Now, the government says it’s still in the process of reviewing the legislation. “The department is considering revisions to the non-essential pesticide use legislation to provide clarity respecting pesticide sale and informed use,” a government spokesperson told Global News. “The department consulted with Manitobans on...

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  • Wed May 24 2017

    Weed survey picks a winner: Palmer amaranth

    Surveys and ratings sometimes offer surprises. Other times they offer the assurance and confirmation of something you thought was true and now you know. In 2016, the Weed Science Society of America conducted a survey to identify the most common and most troublesome weed in 12 categories of broadleaf crops and fruits and vegetables. The winner of the most common category is common lambsquarters. It's everywhere and while relatively easy to control has developed its share of resistance to products like the triazine class of herbicides. Other "common" weeds include foxtail - giant, green an...

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  • Mon May 22 2017

    Warning: This plant that can ruin your summer

    SEE LINK TO VIEW VIDEO UNION, Iowa -- When you venture outside this summer, be on the lookout for Wild Parsnip. The poisonous weed grows in nearly all 50 U.S. states. In fact, the plant's growth in Iowa has prompted Department of Natural Resources there to issue a warning, KCCI reports. Wendy Prusha, of Union, Iowa, was exposed to Wild Parsnip while working in her yard. She developed a rash and ended up in the emergency room. "It's a constant burning. It just bubbled up overnight," she said. "The oils sit on your skin, it's a constant burning and it eats away your skin." Pars...

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  • Sun May 21 2017

    War on Weeds: Prostrate pigweed

    This weed may invade your land. Be ready to oppose it. The Enemy: Prostrate pigweed (Amaranthus blitoides) Strategy: Prostrate pigweed is a native mat-forming summer annual weed that invades thin, damaged or under-fertilized lawns and disturbed open soils. The leaves have a white midvein and produce a columnar seed head that appears to contain spikes. It is common in areas with disturbed soils or neglected open landscapes. This plant is similar to the redroot pigweed that we see in gardens and agricultural fields. Prostrate pigweed, as the name applies, grows flat to the ground and fo...

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  • Sat May 20 2017

    Don’t be fooled by this weed’s pretty flower

    Don’t be fooled by this weed’s pretty flower Noxious weeds: Field scabious By Association of Alberta Agricultural Fieldmen Published: May 17, 2017 The flower of field scabious is pretty but the weed can invade hayfields and other grassy areas and be widely dispersed via baled forage. Photo: Jeremy Ross Field scabious was introduced as an ornamental from Europe and is now taking over roadsides and pastures. It can be found throughout central Alberta and has the ability to invade even undisturbed plant communities, such as hayfields. Once established it is very difficult to c...

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  • Sat May 20 2017

    From Vermont, new online tool to fight invasive species

    Click the title to go to site and watch the video. There's a new online tool to help Vermonters who want to work to fight the spread of invasive species. Gwen Kozlowski is the coordinator for the UVM Extension Outreach. She gave us a look at the new tool, Vermont Invasives. Watch the video to see.

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  • Sat May 20 2017

    in Nebraska, Counties are keeping score with their weed control programs

    Adams County Weed Superintendent Eric Walston wants property owners to know they are required to control noxious weeds on their own ground. Pursuant to the Noxious Weed Control Act, he publishes a notice in the Hastings Tribune every spring stating that message. Of the 12 noxious weeks in Nebraska, the most common in Adams County is musk thistle. “If they can just control their musk thistle by the end of June usually and again in the fall that’s great,” he said. Other noxious weeds in the state include plumeless thistle, Canada thistle, leafy spurge, knapweed (spotted and diffus...

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  • Sat May 20 2017

    Weed of the Week: wild oats

    They are everywhere, and in some cases they are getting hard to kill. Wild oats, formally known as avena fatua, cost farmers an estimated $500 million dollars a year, and despite a wide range of tools to control the pest, some of the best are the old-school ones. Despite being a problem for most of the past 100 years, prairie producers are still losing yield and spending more on controlling the weed than ever. Due to herbicide resistance, prairie farmers’ fight with the pest isn’t likely to end any time soon. Hugh Beckie of Agriculture Canada’s research centre in Saskatoon has said...

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  • Fri May 19 2017

    Wild Parsnip BURNS! Worse Than Poison Ivy?

    Parsnip burns? That’s right. Did you know you can get third-degree burns from a weed that’s commonly found in most gardens across America? Last month, I was weeding my (admittedly very overgrown) garden. I wasn’t wearing gloves, but I wasn’t too concerned about anything except spiders. Usually, those guys run away instead of attack, so long as you’re not too careless about where you’re sticking your hands, you should be fine. I was outside for several hours after that, and by that evening, I noticed that the side of my wrist felt like I’d burned it. I dismissed it, thinking I must hav...

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